Sunday Social

Tomorrow evening I leave for Knoxville for training on Floriani Total Control U and Floriani Quilting software. In the meantime I have a version to start exploring. I created a monster that I’m now (for today) using as my profile picture on facebook. life-9.jpg

Then there is this. Even when life has been a bit challenging it’s still good. Something like this will be part of a sample that I make as I learn the software and begin teaching. There’s a lot to learn but I’m so game.

I get to meet with Kathy Sawyer Tuesday night. We met in Knoxville the first time I taught with AQS.

The August Quilted Block of the Month posted yesterday. The space in this particular block is filled, I have a plan for Saturday.

block complete

I’m participating in the Back to School Blog Hop hosted by Sam Hunter of Hunters Design Studio. Start on Sam’s post, she’s posted a video tutorial showing how to spray baste a quilt.

Day 2 – August 16 – Mandy Leins: Thread Dread: removing stray bits after quilting
Day 3 – August 17 – Nancy Stovall: The Sweet Creamy Filling
Day 4 – August 18 – Ebony Love: 7 Indispensible feet for your sewing machine Day 5 – August 19 – Michelle FreedmanMichelle Freedman: Machine throat plates
Day 6 – August 20 – Teresa Coates: Edge/Under/Top stitching
Day 7 – August 21 – Kelly Cole: Ten ways to regain your sew-jo
Day 8 – August 22 – Megan Dougherty: Choose to Fuse: tips for working with fusibles for applique
Day 9 – August 23 – Kim Lapacek: Tricks to being productive while hauling your kids around
Day 10 – August 24 – Yvonne Fuchs: Circuitboard quilting on Domestic and Longarm Machines
Day 11 – August 25 – Sandi Hazlewood: Chain Piecing Quilt Blocks Tips
Day 12 – August 26 – Juliet van der Heijden: Paper-piecing with children
Day 13 – August 27 – Maddie Kertay: Fabric folding for any storage solution
Day 14 – August 28 – Cath Hall: Working with Lawn fabric
Day 15 – August 29 – Tracy Mooney: Tips for the perfect seam
Day 16 – August 30 – Teri Lucas: How to bury thread
Day 17 – August 31 – Debby Brown: Securing machine quilting knots
Day 18 – September 1 – Flaun Cline: How to put some sparkle in your fabric pull (part 1)
Day 19 – September 2 – Jessica Darling: How to put some sparkle in your fabric pull (part 2)
Day 20 – September 3 – Trish Frankland: A bigger blade really IS better?!
Day 21 – September 4 – Lynn Krawczyk: Build a simple design with hand stitching
Day 22 – September 5 – Jane Davidson: How to make scrappy HSTs
Day 23 – September 6 – Linda Pearl: Low cost tips for organizing your sewing room
Day 24 – September 7 – Christa Watson – Top 10 tips for quilting on a domestic machine
Day 25 – September 8 – Sarah Nunes: To Starch or Not to Starch
Day 26 – September 9 – Suzy Webster: Testing fabric for bleeding
Day 27 – September 10 – Sarah Goer: Machine bind your quilts like a pro
Day 28 – September 11 – Vanda Chittenden: Beginner paper-piecing tips
Day 29 – September 12 – Cheryl Sleboda: Needle threading tips
Day 30 – September 13 – Kim Niedzwiecki – Different thread weights and when to use them
Day 31 – September 14 – Sandra Healy: Conquer Your Fear of Machine Appliqué
Day 32 – September 15 – Sandra Starley: The Basics of Antique Quilt Collecting

Here’s a link to my upcoming teaching schedule.

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Lucy’s Nickles
Quilt Coach more on this soon.

Have a great quilterly day,

Teri

Quilted Block of the Month August 2017

house block 1I may have let out a little bit squeal when the idea hit for how to quilt this last section of this August Block. I’ve been playing with curved cross hatching a lot lately and loving it.
In giving thought to the shape, that corners look like a house and wanting the Visual to draw the eye to the peak of the roof the curve would head in that direction – generally.

house block curved cross hatch 1

Repeating – not going for perfection rather I’m going for effect. I’m using the dark stitched line as my ditch to move along. Today’s thread is Superior Threads Twist, a 40 weight trilobal polyester twisting two shades of color together. It’s really incredible.

house block curves complete

I knew I would like the curved cross hatch. What I wasn’t expecting is to love it, when combined with the other motifs in the block. There is real dynamic and subtle movement.

block complete

The curved cross hatch feeds into the twist of the “log cabin” style quilting in the on point squares. Add the spiral in and the visual movement is so cool. I chose print by SewBatik for the quilt top. The quilting ends up having a subtle rather than overpowering effect on the quilt. There are a few things that factor into that: the color in the print, the color of the threads, the weight of the thread, and the density of quilting.

block complete back of quilt

The movement is even more apparent on the back of the quilt block. I can imagine a whole quilt of this block quilted just like this.

This is one reason to sit with a quilt and let it speak to you. All week, while I’ve worked on a couple of other things I’ve been looking wondering what to do.  And here we go.

August Quilted Block of the Month an Original
August Quilted Block of the Month Week 2

Because this month isn’t quite as involved I’m going to do a little something special for next week. Not quite sure yet but something is simmering in my head so stay tuned.

August 31st I’m participating in the Back to School Blog Hop.

BTS general

Monday evening I leave for training on the Floriani Total Control U Software. I’m excited, and looking forward to this new venture. I’ll be blogging here and posting my schedule.

Happy Quilting!

Teri

 

Quilted Block of the Month August week 2

Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!
The congratulatory messages on my new position with Floriani are simply awe inspiring.

Now onto our regularly scheduled program:center square

 

Oh I do remember giving  you this update sometime during the week in Instagram. Debby was stitching this motif on a postcard, and I was inspired by it. I’m not entirely certain that Debby posted this anywhere publicly so just know that I have permission to copy her homework at any time. Cool, eh? With this project you have permission to copy my homework. If you’re playing along please feel free to send me pictures and I’ll share them here on the blog.
Remember I tend to show all the stuff that I’m not happy with because I’m still learning how to machine quilt. 2017-08-11 19.29.52

Bernina 24 foot on ruler

 

 

The free-hand embroidery foot is aboutt 1/4” from needle center to the outer edge of the foot. I chose a spot roughly in the center of the square to start stitching a circle. Once the circle closed I very slowly started curving out until the edge of the foot was on the center circle. I kept stitching around, and around, and around, and around, and around and around. Once I reached the edge the ditch helped me keep the curves consistent. Using 80 weight thread in the bobbin means that there is little thready build up, and the fabric doesn’t distort.

IMG_20170804_163514

I’m going to show this one in a very quick vid.

This should give you an idea of how this motif is stitched out. This one looks like a wonky log cabin block, however it’s stitched from the outside in. On the quilt itself I simply winged it. In the video I used a ruler to make the lines. Going from the outside in is what helps create the visual twist.

in block stitching square 2
It’s interesting how thread looks on different color. 80 weight thread is the best!
in block stitching square 3
I like the different texture with the straight lines in the square and the ribbon candy in the border.
in block stitching square
This is the first square I stitched in. While I’ve done this before I wasn’t quite remembering the rhythm of the stitching. It came back after the first full round.

square ribbon candy

Stay tuned next week for the next installment of the Quilted Block of the Month.
Quilted Block of the Month August week one

Happy Quilting,

Teri

 

 

 

 

 

Shine Your Light

Yvonne porcella quiltShine Your Light, one of the quilts in the “Live Your Brightest Life, A Tribute to Yvonne Porcella hosted by Pokey Bolton” arrived home last night, rolled up, in plastic (to keep it dry in case!), and in just the perfect box with the info sheet with it.

Thank you Pokey, and Thank you Yvonne.

there is something amazingly special about this quilt, to me. In the last few days I’ve had reminders of the events going on in my life at that particular moment of time. I was out of my home 13 hours a day. I had to give up writing a book that I’ve longed to write, and the quilt shop where I worked was in the process of closing. Let’s just say that the physical tiredness, coupled with the heart wrenching decision to Let Go, and the emotional fatigue was off the charts. There is some other stuff that I’ll just hold onto. So to have a quilt like this happen, in a relatively short amount of time….ooooph.

Having the quilt selected to be part of the exhibit buoyed my spirits. Sometime soon it will hang in my sewing room as a reminder to Live my Brightest Life, to pour all of who I am into the quilt making that I get to do, the people I am privileged to teach, and work with in the quilting community.

Speaking of Bright Lights. I’m sharing this link to Lisa Sipe’s Go Fund Me page. She is, without a doubt, a bright light in our quilt community. As you may have heard Lisa lost the lower part of her left leg. She’s not able to work right now, however she’s made major strides (she would love the word play) being able to take her dogs out for a walk on her own. This is huge. At some point down the road she’s going to need a prosthesis…so I’m sure her goal of $25,000 isn’t going to quite meet her needs.

Quilt a Bright Life Friends,

Teri

Quilted Block of the Month Part 3

“How do you get from here to there?” she asked. I promised to show her. When stitching on a pieced block, the ditch is your bestie.
qbom ribbon candy peak

The ribbon candy ended at the peak, to start the next wedge there are two options:
stop, tie off the thread, then restart in the next wedge. A viable option, one that I’d give consideration if this were a competition quilt.

travel in the ditch. This is a favorite option as it saves time, and thread. Depending on the weight of the thread it’s possible to stitch in the ditch several times without creating bulk, or warping the look of the quilt.

qbom travel 2

Stitching on the line, or in that ditch is key, however remember it’s perfectly fine if it’s not perfect. Wobbles on quilts add character.

qbom travel 3

I pause here to reposition my hands for a smooth transition.

qbom travel 4

You can see that the stitching isn’t exactly on that line. Yes I’m breaking my own rule for now showing the flaws. It’s my job as the teacher, and I take it very seriously. Yeah. Bridge. Brooklyn. I’ll make lots of money.

qbom travel 5

It’s only a little off, and most people wouldn’t notice it. Starting at the top of the peak let the ribbon candy begin. Next week there will drawings of the ribbon candy in the wedge, and the swirly sun motif in the lower corner.

qbom done

The next bit is NOT picking apart my work at all. overall I love this piece and will be happy to show it at any teaching venue.

Design Decisions happen.

Now I had to set this block aside for a few days. Upon returning I didn’t look before starting to quilt to see what thread I was using. I switched from Superior’s MicroQuilter to Wonderfil’s FabuLux, noticing only when starting the second wedge. I could have taken the stitching out, however I was grooving on the change in look, and the overall feel so I left it.

qbom yellow arrow

While stitching all the straight lines some distraction happened, phone call, meeting whatever – on one of the straight lines I stopped earlier than intended, to “fix it” an echoed circle seemed a great idea. It’s different, eye catching, and helps the eye travel over the surface of the quilt block. Were this a competition quilt the seam ripper and I would have had a hot date.

20170325_084043
One HOT date

I chose to bind front to back and stitch in the ditch, there are a couple of places where it’s not exactly pretty and there’s a wee bit o’fixin’ that needs to happen. Just not today.

Here are links to each one of the posts:

Week 1
Week 1a
Week 2a

Next week will be the final post for this block. If you have questions please ask. I love giving extra information.

Happy Quilting,

Teri

Quilted Block of the Month: New York Beauty

Welcome to the Quilted Block of the Month. In each issue I’ll post the block, and supplies – batting, thread, needles. I’ll show how the block is drawn on the fabric, with any rulers.
I will be using these blocks as class samples so each one will get it’s own binding. This wil make a good quilt as you go project.

This months supplies:
SewLine Pencil – this is my first time using this pencil, and so far I’m quite pleased.
Collins Quilt and Sew Ruler
45 mm rotary cutter
6” x 24” Ruler
12 1/2” square of hand dyed fabric from my stash
12 1/2″ to 15” square of a light gray solid from my stash
12 1/2” to 15”  square needle punched cotton batting – this is from my stash and I don’t know the brand
80 weight polyester thread for ditch work and bobbin (Superior MicroQuilter)
40 weight trilobal polyester (FabuLux by Wonderfil and Magnifico by Superior)

The first block: New York Beauty.  
I chose this as one of my first competition quilts is When Alex & Jinny met in NY Beauty Happened, and I love New York Beauty Blocks, as it’s a great reminder of home in both the Chrysler Building and the Statue of Liberty.

Block one quarter inch seam

Step one: cut a 12 1/2” square of cotton fabric. Using either the Quilt & Sew Ruler or the 6” x 24” ruler mark a line 1/4” in from each one of the edges. These lines serve the purpose of seam lines joining blocks together. I will use the ditch and the seam allowance to move to the next stitching place. Oh but I am getting ahead of myself here.

NYB corner curve

After the lines were drawn creating the seam allowance I chose to freehand the corner curves, then added dots about one inch apart along the length of the corner curve.

NYB Ruler Sew Line Marking pencil

Halfway between the dots I lined up the ruler, straight up from the inside curve to the outside curve and placed a dot at the top.
Using the Quilt & Sew Ruler I joined the lines, to create the spikes. This is where the SewLine marking pencil came in handy, the lines are consistent, and there’s not stopping to sharpen pencils.

NYB Drawing lines

After twenty four years of quilting I think I have the marking pencil that works long term.

NYB stitching in the ditch

Now it’s time to stitch in the ditch. First line of stitching: along the inside curve.
NYB 80 wt thread

Then along each one of the spikes. I stitch slowly, about 1/2 speed or less. This gives me great control as move over the surface of the quilt.

NYB around the block

Once I finished stitching the upper curve, next was the entire seam allowance around the piece.

NYB stitched in the ditch ready for quilting

Right now it looks all fluffy in places and ways that are entirely frustrating and inappropriate. However, this is good practice for stitching in the ditch. This is an important component of stabilizing a pieced quilt top.

Here’s a sneak peek of next weeks blog post:

NYB tension check

This is a tension issue that I’ll show you how we dealt with this.

I have a plan for the August Quilted Block of the Month, it’s a block that I’ve been wanting to make for a while.

Happy Quilting,

Teri

@terilucas
#terilucasquilts
#quiltedblockofthemonth
@terificreations

 

A posting of posts

IMG_20160807_213205_resizedWell that was a completely strange day. I started a project, started the redesign on a quilt for Lucy’s Nickles, went back to the project, had a phone meeting, went back to the project, finished the project, finished the redesign on the quilt, and made dinner.

Now understanding that I’m not a fan of cooking meals is of prime importance here. We generally have dinner later in the evening because of the current work schedule. Being the primary cook at the moment there are a few, life-long habits that making cooking challenging such as waiting a little longer than necessary to check the freezer for the tastiest morsel. I’ve taken to brining the protein to assist the thawing process. As I sit here writing I keep thinking hmmm, what’s in the freezer now? It’s almost noon, perhaps I should do something about dinner. Oh darn it, it’s 1:30, sheesh where did that 90 minutes disappear? Found something. Thawing. Gah! Will I make it in time? I would rather be baking. Seriously. Quilting, always.

???????????????????????????????For Lucy’s Nickles the next quilt has been posted. We’re not starting it for a little bit to give the quilters time to finish the current project. The new project will involve a wee bit of trapunto, layers of batting, lots of thread, miles, miles and miles.

Here are a few links:

Craft Napa workshops

Cheryl Sleboda talks about quilting success.

Jenny Lyon speaks on FriXion Pens.

Debby Brown has so many Cuties.

October is turning out to be fairly special this year…I’m still so honored to be part of the Dutchess Heritage Quilt Show.

Instagram @terilucas
Twitter @terificreations
#terilucasquilts

Have a great quilterly day.

Teri