Thank YOU!

There are many, many thank you’s this week.
First, Trish and the Dutchess Heritage Quilt Show Committee, it was an honor to be invited to be the Featured Speaker. I really enjoyed spending the weekend at the show, sharing quilting, and teaching each one of the quilters who attended. Our quilts are the story of who we are, stitched together with needle and thread.

Thank you Beth, Innkeeper of the Grand Dutchess Bed & Breakfast in Red Hook. You are a delightful hostess, and a good cook!

Gentle reader if you are in the area of Dutchess Community College there is an exhibit of quilts though October 22nd in the Mildred I Washington Art Building. Check their pages for times the exhibit is open.

Thank you Debby Brown for capturing images like this:

and this:

we had dinner with Paula Reid, Trish and Holly, a fun time was had by allp

and holding up quilts

and not eating my chocolate cake

and just being there.

Sometimes I think I’m horrible at taking pictures when I’m on the road teaching and this weekend I realized I’m in this moment talking quilts and being with my students.

I enjoyed the moments I got to spend in the S&S booth, talking about the BERNINA 7 Series machines. It’s no secret they are my fave.

As with any teaching trip there is always an adventure! Let’s just say that I ended up being able to rent a mini-van for the weekend, which made me silly happy because more people and stuff fit in a mini-van than a smaller car. YAY. I got apples too. There will be apple pie. YAY for apple pie.

I’ll be at the Quilt Basket on Saturday January 20th for an all day class. We’re still working on the what but it will focus on machine quilting.

November 9 – 11 is Connections Quilt Festival. I’m teaching classes each day and will have the Quilt as Desired Quilts on display.

I’ll be at Quilt Market, where I have two classes Creating Consumer Confidence – Machine Sales and Creating Consumer Confidence in the In-Store Staff. These are tips I’ve learned over the years working in quilt shops, and working towards becoming the national machine quilting teacher I’ve always wanted to be.

I’m staying over to work in the Pinwheels booth with Maria Tamaoka. Stop by the booth say hi! and adopt some Daiwabo, or Oakshott Cottons for your stash! I’m happy to help the adoption go through.

Watch Instagram today for apple pie pics. I bought APPLES!!!

Happy Quilting,

Teri

 

A little or a lot? Or how much quilting for this quilt?

20449106_10213973184472142_3759714678466190392_oHow much threadwork does this quilt need?

A little?

A medium amount?

A lot?

This question comes up frequently often saying something like, “I see all these quilts that are quilted to within an inch of life and I don’t ‘get it’, ‘like it’, ‘understand it’.” or “I like quilts that are quilted this way because they belong on my bed.” or “my walls are warm enough”

bob at Roanoak
Celebrating 25 years with this guy on Wednesday September 27th I love him!

There’s a reason why the word “It’s your quilt, it’s your rules” frequently exits my lips – this part – like so much of quilting – is all about you. You get to pick. You get to choose the lime green and pair it with the deep gray. You get to pick what weight, and color thread.

A slightly more complex answer begins with the following questions:

What is the end purpose of the quilt?
What batting will be used?
What thread(s) will be used?

Once these questions are answered then the rest, like a cute puppy, will follow you home. I’ll give an example:
double-irish-chain-full-viewI’m planning on remaking a quilt for my sweetie and I, a double Irish chain, using a variety of colors, and a gray background. As it’s a remake of a quilt I already own I get to make choices that are significantly different than the first quilt (seen here on the left)

First – no muslin. There are two different weights here because I didn’t know any better in that moment. The cream is where the gray will be.

Not only the gray background, the rest of the colors will be changing as well. My use, and understanding of color has changed.

Second – it’ll be bigger. It covers our queen sized bed, but not with us under it. I’m not a fan of fighting for the covers, are you?

Third – it will be all machine quilted, a bit more consistently across the surface. This is comes from the years of experience I now have. This will reflect where I am as a quilter now, and this is my choice.

Fourth – batting – most likely wool, or silk. because I like how they show off the quilting. When I started quilting this I used a dense cotton, I liked it at the time. However my experience now brought other battings into my quilting world. It’s been exciting exploring what they do. In an upcoming post I’ll share the battings I use and why.

Fifth – thread – it used to be all cotton. Now there are so many threads – cotton, wool, polyester, silk that are worth a look. Then there’s weight. Oh dear me I’m getting excited thinking about the possibilities!

So this is a bed quilt, with wool batting. Depending on the batting I might be able to quilt 4 – 8″ apart. So that will, in some ways, determine how much quilting is stitched over the surface of the quilt.

Now I’ll talk about whole cloth, and art quilts a little later on. Stay tuned!

Happy Quilting,

Teri

PS there’s still time to enter a quilt in the Connections Quilt Festival I’m filling out the paperwork for 2 later this morning!

Quilted Block of the Month – Brain Overload it’s a Think

kal 2 use this oneGood Saturday morning friends. This is a morning of several tales of how we, as creatives, can over think things, make some mistakes, and that we can recover.

So, this morning as I sipped coffee, and realized it’s Saturday. Saturday, you know the day I’m committed to posting the Quilted Block of the Month. I got nuthin’! Nuthin’ dang it. The quilt is sitting in front of the Sizzix taunting me. How you might ask? Well, thank you for asking the question because this deserves something of a discussion.
But first allow me to pause and share this blog that got me thinking about what to write this morning, that I do have something to share. In the first few paragraphs the author, Sarah, writes about dropping things, and how this triggers memories from days long gone, and not in a straight line order. One memory is older, one is newer, all associating with the dropping and catching, or tossing from one hand to the next of some object.

These  words evoked a ton of images in my brain. Seemingly scattered, yet all meaningful in a delightfully weird, connected way.

You see this week has been fraught with some frustration, some serious work, and some honest-to-goodness solutions. If I were braver in this moment I’d show you the creative mess I’m working in (don’t judge, it actually works for me). I’d love to be in a tidier space, however it won’t happen until we decide to repaint this room in the autumn orange I’ve been jonesing for, forever. Then everything will come out of the room. Now this has me thinking about replacing the flooring to something other than carpet because the chair I have sinks into the carpet making hard to move, even with the huge chair mat underneath it.

I’m working on a quilt that needs to be ready for Quilt Market. In and of itself this is not a problem, I can, and do make quilts. However there are some specifics about this quilt that need to be in place. I was having some trouble, and realized I was using the wrong product.

dance bang head 1975First of all, I felt like a bit of an idiot at first. Then I realized, I’d made a mistake, it’s fixable, and I can move on. Done.

I’m also working on PowerPoint presentations for Quilt Market. I realized a long time ago that I do a lot of thinking before working something out. When I was in high school I’d do term papers and other things right before they were due. Sometimes the night before. I’d partly get myself all worked up about the due date, and what I had to do, then just sit down and get it done. What happens is, all of the thinking that happens when I’m all disconcerted end up being wildly productive. With the two I need to work on one is nearly complete and the other is still wandering about my head a little bit, however will be done in short order.

Now, back to the quilt. The possibilities for quilting are endless. That said there are a couple of ideas niggling at the back of my brain. I’ve wanted to highlight the circular movement that happens as a direct result of the angles in the quilt. While looking at the photo this morning I have a clearer idea of how I want that to happen. And it’s not how the original idea or thought.

So while thinking about what to write this morning 5 different options presented themselves, that I like. As of this moment I’m not quite sure which of these will win the incredibly vehement discussion in my head. Once that happens the discussion for thread will begin. And that, as you know, is a rather complicated, and involved discussion. Stay tuned. This should get really interesting.

While I’m often confident when I get started stitching there is still a struggle inside my brain for what will happen over the surface of a quilt. You’d think after all this dang time it’d be really easy. Nope. One thing leads to another, and another, and another. Resolutions come in the midst of come really weird, self-berating things that whizz around at light speed in my thoughts, and dream.

Now that these words are finished typing I can get to the sewing machine and finish one of 8 projects, all vying for attention. At the same time.

Happy Quilting!

Teri

Quilted Block of the Month August 2017

Bonus Edition

img_0230.jpg

This is one of the blocks I quilted when I was trying to write a book on free motion machine quilting.

Step 1: Cut two 10” squares of cotton fabric, layer with batting.

Step 2: Quilt. This sounds wildly simplistic and rather annoying. I get it. But, it’s what I did, and do.

Please allow me to back up a bit. A long time ago, in another galaxy, I was inspired by the Color Fixes on Linda M Poole’s blog. My finger would start making the general shape of the image while gazing upon the loveliness. Often these images swirled around in my brain for days, the color whirling and swirling to and fro like the ocean waves, or the concentric circles resulting from a stone thrown in a pond.

When sitting down to stitch something like this I’d grab those square, add batting – whatever I have on hand – and get started stitching. They never look like the images on Linda’s site. Nope. These are always in the form of whatever my brain is thinking in that moment. I pick a thread that inspires me in that moment, pick a spot along the edge and start stitching across somewhere. Along the way the line will bend, and curve, sometimes ending on the right or left side rather than directly across. Then I’ll echo back about 1/8th of an inch away from the previous line. Back and forth, back and forth until I like how it looks.

There is no worrying about perfection on these pieces. There is simply doing.

img_0226.jpg

Later on adding words started happening. Because quilting is a lot like hand writing.

So when you have a moment make a 10” quilt sandwich, grab your favorite spool of thread, put in a fresh needles that goes with your favorite thread, and get started stitching. “Don’t worry if its not good enough for anyone else to hear, just sing, sing a song.” Or in this case, quilt, quilt a quilt.

August Quilted Block of the Month
Quilted Block of the Month August Week 2
Quilted block of the Month August Week 3

Happy Quilting!

Teri

Sunday Social

Tomorrow evening I leave for Knoxville for training on Floriani Total Control U and Floriani Quilting software. In the meantime I have a version to start exploring. I created a monster that I’m now (for today) using as my profile picture on facebook. life-9.jpg

Then there is this. Even when life has been a bit challenging it’s still good. Something like this will be part of a sample that I make as I learn the software and begin teaching. There’s a lot to learn but I’m so game.

I get to meet with Kathy Sawyer Tuesday night. We met in Knoxville the first time I taught with AQS.

The August Quilted Block of the Month posted yesterday. The space in this particular block is filled, I have a plan for Saturday.

block complete

I’m participating in the Back to School Blog Hop hosted by Sam Hunter of Hunters Design Studio. Start on Sam’s post, she’s posted a video tutorial showing how to spray baste a quilt.

Day 2 – August 16 – Mandy Leins: Thread Dread: removing stray bits after quilting
Day 3 – August 17 – Nancy Stovall: The Sweet Creamy Filling
Day 4 – August 18 – Ebony Love: 7 Indispensible feet for your sewing machine Day 5 – August 19 – Michelle FreedmanMichelle Freedman: Machine throat plates
Day 6 – August 20 – Teresa Coates: Edge/Under/Top stitching
Day 7 – August 21 – Kelly Cole: Ten ways to regain your sew-jo
Day 8 – August 22 – Megan Dougherty: Choose to Fuse: tips for working with fusibles for applique
Day 9 – August 23 – Kim Lapacek: Tricks to being productive while hauling your kids around
Day 10 – August 24 – Yvonne Fuchs: Circuitboard quilting on Domestic and Longarm Machines
Day 11 – August 25 – Sandi Hazlewood: Chain Piecing Quilt Blocks Tips
Day 12 – August 26 – Juliet van der Heijden: Paper-piecing with children
Day 13 – August 27 – Maddie Kertay: Fabric folding for any storage solution
Day 14 – August 28 – Cath Hall: Working with Lawn fabric
Day 15 – August 29 – Tracy Mooney: Tips for the perfect seam
Day 16 – August 30 – Teri Lucas: How to bury thread
Day 17 – August 31 – Debby Brown: Securing machine quilting knots
Day 18 – September 1 – Flaun Cline: How to put some sparkle in your fabric pull (part 1)
Day 19 – September 2 – Jessica Darling: How to put some sparkle in your fabric pull (part 2)
Day 20 – September 3 – Trish Frankland: A bigger blade really IS better?!
Day 21 – September 4 – Lynn Krawczyk: Build a simple design with hand stitching
Day 22 – September 5 – Jane Davidson: How to make scrappy HSTs
Day 23 – September 6 – Linda Pearl: Low cost tips for organizing your sewing room
Day 24 – September 7 – Christa Watson – Top 10 tips for quilting on a domestic machine
Day 25 – September 8 – Sarah Nunes: To Starch or Not to Starch
Day 26 – September 9 – Suzy Webster: Testing fabric for bleeding
Day 27 – September 10 – Sarah Goer: Machine bind your quilts like a pro
Day 28 – September 11 – Vanda Chittenden: Beginner paper-piecing tips
Day 29 – September 12 – Cheryl Sleboda: Needle threading tips
Day 30 – September 13 – Kim Niedzwiecki – Different thread weights and when to use them
Day 31 – September 14 – Sandra Healy: Conquer Your Fear of Machine Appliqué
Day 32 – September 15 – Sandra Starley: The Basics of Antique Quilt Collecting

Here’s a link to my upcoming teaching schedule.

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Quilt Coach more on this soon.

Have a great quilterly day,

Teri

Quilted Block of the Month August 2017

house block 1I may have let out a little bit squeal when the idea hit for how to quilt this last section of this August Block. I’ve been playing with curved cross hatching a lot lately and loving it.
In giving thought to the shape, that corners look like a house and wanting the Visual to draw the eye to the peak of the roof the curve would head in that direction – generally.

house block curved cross hatch 1

Repeating – not going for perfection rather I’m going for effect. I’m using the dark stitched line as my ditch to move along. Today’s thread is Superior Threads Twist, a 40 weight trilobal polyester twisting two shades of color together. It’s really incredible.

house block curves complete

I knew I would like the curved cross hatch. What I wasn’t expecting is to love it, when combined with the other motifs in the block. There is real dynamic and subtle movement.

block complete

The curved cross hatch feeds into the twist of the “log cabin” style quilting in the on point squares. Add the spiral in and the visual movement is so cool. I chose print by SewBatik for the quilt top. The quilting ends up having a subtle rather than overpowering effect on the quilt. There are a few things that factor into that: the color in the print, the color of the threads, the weight of the thread, and the density of quilting.

block complete back of quilt

The movement is even more apparent on the back of the quilt block. I can imagine a whole quilt of this block quilted just like this.

This is one reason to sit with a quilt and let it speak to you. All week, while I’ve worked on a couple of other things I’ve been looking wondering what to do.  And here we go.

August Quilted Block of the Month an Original
August Quilted Block of the Month Week 2

Because this month isn’t quite as involved I’m going to do a little something special for next week. Not quite sure yet but something is simmering in my head so stay tuned.

August 31st I’m participating in the Back to School Blog Hop.

BTS general

Monday evening I leave for training on the Floriani Total Control U Software. I’m excited, and looking forward to this new venture. I’ll be blogging here and posting my schedule.

Happy Quilting!

Teri

 

Quilted Block of the Month August week 2

Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!
The congratulatory messages on my new position with Floriani are simply awe inspiring.

Now onto our regularly scheduled program:center square

 

Oh I do remember giving  you this update sometime during the week in Instagram. Debby was stitching this motif on a postcard, and I was inspired by it. I’m not entirely certain that Debby posted this anywhere publicly so just know that I have permission to copy her homework at any time. Cool, eh? With this project you have permission to copy my homework. If you’re playing along please feel free to send me pictures and I’ll share them here on the blog.
Remember I tend to show all the stuff that I’m not happy with because I’m still learning how to machine quilt. 2017-08-11 19.29.52

Bernina 24 foot on ruler

 

 

The free-hand embroidery foot is aboutt 1/4” from needle center to the outer edge of the foot. I chose a spot roughly in the center of the square to start stitching a circle. Once the circle closed I very slowly started curving out until the edge of the foot was on the center circle. I kept stitching around, and around, and around, and around, and around and around. Once I reached the edge the ditch helped me keep the curves consistent. Using 80 weight thread in the bobbin means that there is little thready build up, and the fabric doesn’t distort.

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I’m going to show this one in a very quick vid.

This should give you an idea of how this motif is stitched out. This one looks like a wonky log cabin block, however it’s stitched from the outside in. On the quilt itself I simply winged it. In the video I used a ruler to make the lines. Going from the outside in is what helps create the visual twist.

in block stitching square 2
It’s interesting how thread looks on different color. 80 weight thread is the best!
in block stitching square 3
I like the different texture with the straight lines in the square and the ribbon candy in the border.
in block stitching square
This is the first square I stitched in. While I’ve done this before I wasn’t quite remembering the rhythm of the stitching. It came back after the first full round.

square ribbon candy

Stay tuned next week for the next installment of the Quilted Block of the Month.
Quilted Block of the Month August week one

Happy Quilting,

Teri