Cotton Cuts Charity Mystery Hop

Mystery Quilter logo

There is nothing like multiple deadlines all rolling into one really busy six weeks that says let’s get everything done all on the same day. Yesterday I mentioned I’d been sick, and sleeping was about all I could manage for the entire weekend. So, I slept.

Cottoncuts_color_white bg_small

You may remember a while back I wrote “caution opening box may lead to…”  I had the opportunity to meet up with Kim at spring market. T’was a delightful conversation filled with a few ideas. Including something like this blog hop/Mystery Quilt. Kim is something of a go-getter, took the fabric by the selvage, and started plotting  how this could work for Cotton Cuts – and here we are. I get the privilege of being Clue 3! Woot!

The clue arrived on time, as did a few other things in the works. Like a new job, things to learn, quilts to make for Market, my twenty fifth anniversary and getting ready for a quilt show where I have a boatload of work to prep. I took the aforementioned clue out of the packaging with pencils that have great quilterly sayings. What I didn’t plan on was getting sick right when the clue is due. Whoever expects the Spanish Inquisition._TeamZinnia (2)

With a few projects being worked on at the same time, the pieces were buried under a layer and a half of 2 1/2” squares for one quilt, and fabric ready to be cut into 2 1/2” squares for another project. After finding and sorting them, assigning the appropriate numbers for the fabric, the stitching began in earnest

cotton cuts 1

Oh, did I mention the epiphany I had while starting this project? No, hang onto your seam rippers, I’ll get there soon.

The first part of the clue has 2 segments, after sorting that precut pieces out I started stitching. Cool tidbit: no bunny ears on the triangles.

I’m using Superior MicroQuilter, a 100 wt (very fine) polyester thread for microquilting and applique, and I love it for piecing using a size 70/10 microtex needle, and shortened the stitch length to 2.25 mm.

Using a polyester thread also means I’m going to reduce the heat of the iron for setting the seam and pressing. This reduced heat means I’m not going to burn my fingers. I’m not particularly worried about the thread because I’ve been ironing cotton clothes made with polyester thread for years with no problems at all. What I do love about the 60, 80, and 100 wt threads, is the no bulk in the seam allowance.  cotton cuts 2

After piecing pressing with the finger pressing end of any multi-tool I have. Pictured here is the stiletto from byannie.com one of my faves! cotton-cuts-4-e1507162815600.jpg

I’ll be interested to see how the quilt comes together at the end of all of the clues.cotton cuts 3Because the color way is delightful.
So this Mystery Quilt has a purpose, it will be raffled off once it’s pieced and quilted, to benefit Valley Industries, the company that fulfills Cotton Cuts Boxes, this holds a special place in my heart for oh so many reasons. The raffle will remain open through the entire blogging event, tickets are $5.

Don’t forget to visit Cotton Cuts and read about their Mission.

July – Sheila Christensen (www.mysteryquilter.com) with guest blogger Kim Moos
August – Yvonne Fuchs (www.quiltingjetgirl.com)
September – Teri Lucas (www.terificreations.com)
October – Wendy Welsh (www.wendysquiltsandmore.blogspot.com)
November – Nicole Young (www.lillyella.com)
December – Chris Dodsley (www.madebychrissied.blogspot.com)
January – Amy Smart (www.diaryofaquilter.com)
February – Sam Hunter (www.huntersdesignstudio.com)
March – Cheryl Sleboda (www.muppin.com)

Back to School Blog Hop: Bury Quilt Thread

BTS 16 Teri Lucas

Welcome to the Back to School Blog Hop hosted by Sam Hunter (Hunter’s Design Studio). Thanks Sam! Thirty-two days of tutorials by quilters and sewists, ready to share their experience and tips. At the bottom of the tutorial are links to each of the other participants in the hop. So many great tutorials!

One hundred years ago, when I learned to machine quilt the teacher (Carol Brubaker Martin) taught us many ways to handle thread ends when beginning and ending machine quilting. I settled on, and teach burying the thread ends with a needle and thread. This method gets the thread out of the way so the quilting can progress merrily along. Eventually I will update the PDF on the Tutorials and Helpful Hints page.

bury thread step one start here
Step one, get ready to stitch. Get the quilt under the needle where you want to start quilting.
bury thread step two drop needle
Holding onto the thread, my hands are over there <—-, drop the needle into the quilt.
bury thread step three needle up bring up bobbin
Bring the needle up, and pull on the top thread to pull the bobbin thread to the top of the quilt.
bury thread step four drop needle hold onto thread
Drop the needle back into the same hole. I use the hand wheel for more control.
bury thread step five get started stitching
Get started stitching. Move far enough away from the needle to make room for your hands.
bury thread step six trim thread ends
Clip the thread ends to the same length. This makes the next few steps so much easier.
bury thread step seven thread the needle
I use a Spiral Eye Needle to bury the thread. The opening on the side makes threading quick and easy. Alternately you can use use a quilting needle (size 9 or 10) and a needle threader to thread BOTH threads through the eye. Make a loop of thread, and pull the needle through the loop to make the knot. Alternately wrap the thread around the needle three or four times near the quilt.

 

bury thread step nine heres the knot
Here’s the knot. It’s about one-quarter of an inch away from the quilt. I try to get it about that close so it’s near the quilt, and about that far away so I can easily bury it.
bury thread step ten needle in first hole
Poke the needle into the hole where the thread came from. Wiggle the needle through the batting, this will place the knot IN the batting and out of your way.
bury thread step eleven weave needle through batting
Come up about an inch away from where the thread started.
bury thread step twelve pull through and pop knot
Pull on the thread until the knot goes into the fabric. You may hear a satisfying pop. Unless of course, like me, the music is playing in the background.
bury thread step thirteen clip the thread
Now you’re ready to keep on stitching! Yes, you can stitch over the where you buried the thread! The knot is too small to do any kind of damage, or deflect the needle in any way..
bury thread step fourteen keep quilting
When you’re finished quilting bring the needle up.
bury thread step fifteen needle up pull thread through needle
Grab the top thread and give it a good pull, you’ll need the tail to finish the process.
bury thread step sixteen clip thread and hold onto thread in needle
Clip the thread and hold onto that tail!
bury thread step seventeen drop needle
Drop the needle back down where you took that final stitch.
bury thread step eighteen pull up bobbin thread and clip
While holding onto the thread bring the needle back up. This will pull the bobbin thread up.
bury thread step nineteen heres what the loop looks like
Give the top thread a pull to bring enough of the bobbin thread up to have a tail that you can bury.
bury thread step twenty pull long enough tail
Clip it and…

 

bury thread step twenty one spiral eye needle
Thread the eye of the needle
bury thread step twenty two make quilters knot again loop needle through loop
Make that quilters knot
bury thread step twenty three needle in last thread hole repeat way back
poke the needle in where the thread came up and weave through the batting
bury thread step twenty four pull knot through listen for pop
tug on the thread to hear that pop and pull the knot into the batting
bury thread step twenty five clip threads
Clip the thread and voila! Done.

Now, on the odd chance that the thread didn’t pull back into the quilt put your needle between the batting and the top of the quilt near the thread and sweep the needle. It’ll pull the threads between the layers.

Please visit the other blog hoppers and see what they’ve got goin’ on.

Day 1 – August 15 – Sam Hunter: How to spray baste a BIG quilt
Day 2 – August 16 – Mandy Leins: Thread Dread: removing stray bits after quilting
Day 3 – August 17 – Nancy Stovall: The Sweet Creamy Filling
Day 4 – August 18 – Ebony Love: 7 Indispensible feet for your sewing machine Day 5 – August 19 – Michelle Freedman: Machine throat plates
Day 6 – August 20 – Teresa Coates: Edge/Under/Top stitching
Day 7 – August 21 – Kelly Cole: Ten ways to regain your sew-jo
Day 8 – August 22 – Megan Dougherty: Choose to Fuse: tips for working with fusibles for applique
Day 9 – August 23 – Kim Lapacek: Tricks to being productive while hauling your kids around
Day 10 – August 24 – Yvonne Fuchs: Circuitboard quilting on Domestic and Longarm Machines
Day 11 – August 25 – Sandi Hazlewood: Chain Piecing Quilt Blocks Tips
Day 12 – August 26 – Juliet van der Heijden: Paper-piecing with children
Day 13 – August 27 – Maddie Kertay: Fabric folding for any storage solution
Day 14 – August 28 – Cath Hall: Working with Lawn fabric
Day 15 – August 29 – Tracy Mooney: Tips for the perfect seam
Day 16 – August 30 – Teri Lucas: How to bury thread
Day 17 – August 31 – Debby Brown: Securing machine quilting knots
Day 18 – September 1 – Flaun Cline: How to put some sparkle in your fabric pull (part 1)
Day 19 – September 2 – Jessica Darling: How to put some sparkle in your fabric pull (part 2)
Day 20 – September 3 – Trish Frankland: A bigger blade really IS better?!
Day 21 – September 4 – Robin Koehler Nestlings by Robin: How to travel with handwork
Day 22 – September 5 – Jane Davidson: How to make scrappy HSTs
Day 23 – September 6 – Linda Pearl: Low cost tips for organizing your sewing room
Day 24 – September 7 – Christa Watson – Top 10 tips for quilting on a domestic machine
Day 25 – September 8 – Sarah Nunes: To Starch or Not to Starch
Day 26 – September 9 – Suzy Webster: Testing fabric for bleeding
Day 27 – September 10 – Sarah Goer: Machine bind your quilts like a pro
Day 28 – September 11 – Vanda Chittenden: Beginner paper-piecing tips
Day 29 – September 12 – Cheryl Sleboda: Needle threading tips
Day 30 – September 13 – Kim Niedzwiecki – Different thread weights and when to use them
Day 31 – September 14 – Sandra Healy: Conquer Your Fear of Machine Appliqué
Day 32 – September 15 – Sandra Starley: The Basics of Antique Quilt Collecting

 

Sunday Social

Tomorrow evening I leave for Knoxville for training on Floriani Total Control U and Floriani Quilting software. In the meantime I have a version to start exploring. I created a monster that I’m now (for today) using as my profile picture on facebook. life-9.jpg

Then there is this. Even when life has been a bit challenging it’s still good. Something like this will be part of a sample that I make as I learn the software and begin teaching. There’s a lot to learn but I’m so game.

I get to meet with Kathy Sawyer Tuesday night. We met in Knoxville the first time I taught with AQS.

The August Quilted Block of the Month posted yesterday. The space in this particular block is filled, I have a plan for Saturday.

block complete

I’m participating in the Back to School Blog Hop hosted by Sam Hunter of Hunters Design Studio. Start on Sam’s post, she’s posted a video tutorial showing how to spray baste a quilt.

Day 2 – August 16 – Mandy Leins: Thread Dread: removing stray bits after quilting
Day 3 – August 17 – Nancy Stovall: The Sweet Creamy Filling
Day 4 – August 18 – Ebony Love: 7 Indispensible feet for your sewing machine Day 5 – August 19 – Michelle FreedmanMichelle Freedman: Machine throat plates
Day 6 – August 20 – Teresa Coates: Edge/Under/Top stitching
Day 7 – August 21 – Kelly Cole: Ten ways to regain your sew-jo
Day 8 – August 22 – Megan Dougherty: Choose to Fuse: tips for working with fusibles for applique
Day 9 – August 23 – Kim Lapacek: Tricks to being productive while hauling your kids around
Day 10 – August 24 – Yvonne Fuchs: Circuitboard quilting on Domestic and Longarm Machines
Day 11 – August 25 – Sandi Hazlewood: Chain Piecing Quilt Blocks Tips
Day 12 – August 26 – Juliet van der Heijden: Paper-piecing with children
Day 13 – August 27 – Maddie Kertay: Fabric folding for any storage solution
Day 14 – August 28 – Cath Hall: Working with Lawn fabric
Day 15 – August 29 – Tracy Mooney: Tips for the perfect seam
Day 16 – August 30 – Teri Lucas: How to bury thread
Day 17 – August 31 – Debby Brown: Securing machine quilting knots
Day 18 – September 1 – Flaun Cline: How to put some sparkle in your fabric pull (part 1)
Day 19 – September 2 – Jessica Darling: How to put some sparkle in your fabric pull (part 2)
Day 20 – September 3 – Trish Frankland: A bigger blade really IS better?!
Day 21 – September 4 – Lynn Krawczyk: Build a simple design with hand stitching
Day 22 – September 5 – Jane Davidson: How to make scrappy HSTs
Day 23 – September 6 – Linda Pearl: Low cost tips for organizing your sewing room
Day 24 – September 7 – Christa Watson – Top 10 tips for quilting on a domestic machine
Day 25 – September 8 – Sarah Nunes: To Starch or Not to Starch
Day 26 – September 9 – Suzy Webster: Testing fabric for bleeding
Day 27 – September 10 – Sarah Goer: Machine bind your quilts like a pro
Day 28 – September 11 – Vanda Chittenden: Beginner paper-piecing tips
Day 29 – September 12 – Cheryl Sleboda: Needle threading tips
Day 30 – September 13 – Kim Niedzwiecki – Different thread weights and when to use them
Day 31 – September 14 – Sandra Healy: Conquer Your Fear of Machine Appliqué
Day 32 – September 15 – Sandra Starley: The Basics of Antique Quilt Collecting

Here’s a link to my upcoming teaching schedule.

Follow me on
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Facebook
Lucy’s Nickles
Quilt Coach more on this soon.

Have a great quilterly day,

Teri

Coming right up!

BTS general

Sam Hunter of Hunter’s Design Studios gathered the teachers This is going to be so much fun. I do know what I’m going to do, and I know when I’m going to do it. For right now let’s just say I’m going to tackle a long standing quilting tip.

A friend of mine told this six minute story. I cried.

Check out this facebook vid by Sarah Fabian of the Quilt Basket. There are a few spaces left in “If the Foot Fits use it” I’d love to see you there.

Debby Brown has a new tool! Check out this Postcard Trimming Tool. Not only is this the right size. there are centering lines for the design.

So, do you follow me on Instagram?

Maybe you saw this:

Here's the next block #quiltedblockofthemonth

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or this:

Saturday is the day! Part one of the August block. I designed this block based on a window I saw somewhere in lower Westchester county.

And today, I’m grateful for friends.

Happy Quilting,

Teri

A little bit of this and a little bit of that

 

@swirlygirlsdesign @michaelmillerfabrics #hellofabric Just needs binding. #quiltsrule

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I finished quilting a quilt top this afternoon. It was so fun. The quilting is decidedly not my usual style, but the quilt is so fun and quirky.

Along the top of the quilt I wrote “hello” all over it, and quilted in the hashtag #quiltsrule

In a few places I wrote hello backwards, in others upside down while stitching. It’s a quilting superpower.

A long time ago, in a far, far galaxy lived a quilter who used her sewing machine a lot, a whole lot. She sent it to get cleaned and oiled, and the tech scolded her because there was a lot of lint. This quilter from a far, far away galaxy snorted, because she quilted every single day. The tech reiterated his displeasure at the amount of lint. The quilter wasn’t bothered. Then she found this:

http://weallsew.com/how-to-remove-lint-from-your-sewing-machine/

The thing is that taking care of our machines is like taking care of our vehicles. They need regular maintenance, and there are things we can’t quite get to and a quick visit to the We All Sew Blog will show where the lint goes, and why the tech was eager to share his displeasure. I should have taken my machine in sooner. At the time I was taking my machine in every 2 years, with the amount of quilting I was doing every year would have been a better idea.

I’m off to quilt some more. The Moon is Made of Cheese is calling to me asking for a little attention. As is all the crap – sewing supplies – on my floor waiting for me to spend time tidying up. Speaking of tidying up the Spring Clean Your Studio Blog Tour continues!

Oh and check this out! Sew Much Cosplay by Cheryl Sleboda and Tracy Mooney. Oh this is so amazing. I’ll have more from this dynamic duo soon.

Have a totally fab day!

I was gonna

I was gonna

 

dupioni whole cloth tiny bubblesWrite a post tell you what I’m reading and trying to read. But reading a trashy novel, an inspirational book, or two isn’t all that exciting. The inspirational book that hasn’t grabbed me yet, surprising me a little bit because I like the writing style of this author. It’s due back at the library soon, and it may go back unread. The trashy novel, well, I have read nearly all of these books out of order. I’m not normal, but you knew that. The other book just arrived the other day so cracking it open would be a great idea. But…I’m still getting ready for Market.

I’m making a quilt for Susan Emory of Swirly Girls Fame. It’ll hang in the Michael Miller Booth at Market in a couple of weeks. Check out her new line Hello. Sometime in early June I’ll be participating in a blog hop on GenQ. I had grand ideas of creating quilts in EQ6, and coming up with this exciting, dynamic quilt. Pffft. I finally asked Susan to send me her favorite pieces from the line and I’d create something from that. Adding a few solids rounded out the feel and this afternoon the rest of the quilt came together. Design on the fly is my modus operani. It’s quirky. Shocking I know, right.

After finishing the quilt top I caught a whisper of creativity and had to listen carefully. I picked up a piece originally intended for “the book”. I stitched for a wee nip on that. The feel of the quilt beneath my fingers, the hum of the machine spoke volumes. After about 10 minutes of stitching, and running out of bobbin thread,  I picked up another piece and started stitching with that. The robin’s egg blue at first, purple next stitching for a good stretch. To be honest I had no idea where this one was going. If all goes well over the next few days I’ll get some good stitching time in over the next few days.

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It’s time to get some stitching, writing, respond to a few market related emails. People to see, things to do. Hurry. Hurry.

And a tutorial to write. Oh and the Spring Clean Your Studio Blog Tour continues. #springcleanyourstudio

Happy Quilting!

Teri

Spring Clean Your Studio Blog Tour Day 1

Spring Clean Your Studio Blog Tour Day 1

18217683_10154868553702663_1383341271_nWelcome to the first top on the Spring Clean Your Studio Blog Hop 2017 hosted by Cheryl Sleboda of Muppin.com.

Well. Well. Well. There is something beautiful about the process of opening the windows, blowing out the stale air, pick the stuff up off the floor of the sewing studio, straighten out the fabric, do something to invigorate the quilting senses. Truth be told I don’t mind a bit of a creative mess, however it’s a bit out of control.

When Cheryl mentioned the blog hop I signed up immediately because:

fabric shelf

oh the spillage! It’s terrible. Years ago a friend showed me how to store fabric for maximum use of space.

line it up
line the folded edge of the yardage
fold it over
fold over the ruler – keeping the folded edge lined up
tuck fabric
tuck the last bit of fabric under

 

pull ruler half way out
pull the ruler half way out, and fold the fabric on the ruler to create a lovely folded edge
stack it up
bonus! more fabric fits in the cubby
stack it up 2
the beauty of the fabric shows
making progress
it’s amazing what a couple of hours does for the look of the shelves

The bonus of tidying up is that I get to pet fabric, see what I have, see what still speaks to my quilt heart, and if I want to let anything go. All of it still speaks to my heart. With several pieces I could see whole cloth quilts. My gut says a few of these will happen. One surprised me, deeply surprised me because I don’t do repeats on quilts. But that’s a post for another day.

And here are the blogs for the next 21 days. That’s right 3+ weeks of Spring Clean Your Studio, please visit each blogger on their day. See more studios, meet some cool people, be inspired. #springcleanyourstudio

Happy Quilting!

May 1 – Teri Lucas 
May 2 – Tammy Silvers
May 3 – Emily Breclaw
May 4 – Amalia Moursiewicz
May 5 – John Kubiniec
May 6 – Debby Brown
May 7 – Melissa Marie Collins
May 8 – Delve MIY
May 9 – Misty Cole
May 10 – Sam Hunter
May 11 – Dale Ashera-Davis
May 12 – Sara Mika
May 13 – Sarah Trumpp
May 14 – Carma Halterman
May 15 – Jessica Darling
May 16 – Lisa Chin
May 17 – Sally Johnson
May 18 – Mandy Leins
May 19 – Shruti Dandekar
May 20 – Jane Davila
May 21 – Ebony Love
May 22 – Cheryl Sleboda