Stay Tuned!

kal 2 use this one

Now that Quilt Market is over I can come back to the Quilted Block of the month. Our last block is this amazing kaleidoscope block, which I finished a while ago.

The next part of this block will be drawing it on a solid piece of fabric, then adding quilting. I’ll be talking about batting, thread choices, and motifs. The kaleidoscope is a favorite block as it creates a lot of visual movement with straight line piecing.

The lines in the whole cloth will do the same thing. I have some ideas for quilting that are starting to bubble up to the surface that will give this some dimension and a bit of fun. Oh and another thought…oooh stay tuned!

Enjoy your stitching!

Teri

Quilted Block of the Month – Brain Overload it’s a Think

kal 2 use this oneGood Saturday morning friends. This is a morning of several tales of how we, as creatives, can over think things, make some mistakes, and that we can recover.

So, this morning as I sipped coffee, and realized it’s Saturday. Saturday, you know the day I’m committed to posting the Quilted Block of the Month. I got nuthin’! Nuthin’ dang it. The quilt is sitting in front of the Sizzix taunting me. How you might ask? Well, thank you for asking the question because this deserves something of a discussion.
But first allow me to pause and share this blog that got me thinking about what to write this morning, that I do have something to share. In the first few paragraphs the author, Sarah, writes about dropping things, and how this triggers memories from days long gone, and not in a straight line order. One memory is older, one is newer, all associating with the dropping and catching, or tossing from one hand to the next of some object.

These  words evoked a ton of images in my brain. Seemingly scattered, yet all meaningful in a delightfully weird, connected way.

You see this week has been fraught with some frustration, some serious work, and some honest-to-goodness solutions. If I were braver in this moment I’d show you the creative mess I’m working in (don’t judge, it actually works for me). I’d love to be in a tidier space, however it won’t happen until we decide to repaint this room in the autumn orange I’ve been jonesing for, forever. Then everything will come out of the room. Now this has me thinking about replacing the flooring to something other than carpet because the chair I have sinks into the carpet making hard to move, even with the huge chair mat underneath it.

I’m working on a quilt that needs to be ready for Quilt Market. In and of itself this is not a problem, I can, and do make quilts. However there are some specifics about this quilt that need to be in place. I was having some trouble, and realized I was using the wrong product.

dance bang head 1975First of all, I felt like a bit of an idiot at first. Then I realized, I’d made a mistake, it’s fixable, and I can move on. Done.

I’m also working on PowerPoint presentations for Quilt Market. I realized a long time ago that I do a lot of thinking before working something out. When I was in high school I’d do term papers and other things right before they were due. Sometimes the night before. I’d partly get myself all worked up about the due date, and what I had to do, then just sit down and get it done. What happens is, all of the thinking that happens when I’m all disconcerted end up being wildly productive. With the two I need to work on one is nearly complete and the other is still wandering about my head a little bit, however will be done in short order.

Now, back to the quilt. The possibilities for quilting are endless. That said there are a couple of ideas niggling at the back of my brain. I’ve wanted to highlight the circular movement that happens as a direct result of the angles in the quilt. While looking at the photo this morning I have a clearer idea of how I want that to happen. And it’s not how the original idea or thought.

So while thinking about what to write this morning 5 different options presented themselves, that I like. As of this moment I’m not quite sure which of these will win the incredibly vehement discussion in my head. Once that happens the discussion for thread will begin. And that, as you know, is a rather complicated, and involved discussion. Stay tuned. This should get really interesting.

While I’m often confident when I get started stitching there is still a struggle inside my brain for what will happen over the surface of a quilt. You’d think after all this dang time it’d be really easy. Nope. One thing leads to another, and another, and another. Resolutions come in the midst of come really weird, self-berating things that whizz around at light speed in my thoughts, and dream.

Now that these words are finished typing I can get to the sewing machine and finish one of 8 projects, all vying for attention. At the same time.

Happy Quilting!

Teri

Quilted Block of the Month September 2017 Week 1

If you’ve been following on Instagram you may have taken a gander at this:

Batik Kaleidoscope in progress @sewbatik @sizzix @sizzix_quilting

A post shared by Teri Lucas (@terilucas) on

I’ve been working on a batik kaleidoscope quilt on and off over the last several weeks. It all started with the Sizzix Big Shot Pro, having the ability to cut the pieces quickly, cleanly and easily. There are a couple of things I want to do with the blocks and hey! I can cut more really easily.

So the first thing is:

September Block of the Month

2

Thankfully EQ6 is available making mocking up the block super easy.

line drawing setpember block of the month

I am using an orange/gold for the background on all the blocks. The orange in the mock up is a bit more on the hot red side because warm is good!

So this month there will be a mock up block and a pieced block.

kaleidoscope block color

Excited yet? Because I am.

Happy Quilting!

Teri

August Block of the Month An Original

August Block of the Month An Original

Technical difficulties sometimes present big problems. Other times they are opportunities for learning. Something went screwy a while back, causing something to happen to the version of Microsoft Office installed on my computer. I have an open source that I can use for documents, power point presentations, and graphics, it’s simply not as intuitive as Office. I could use the desktop but that requires a few back flips. I’m hoping by the time I get this posted I’ll at least have a line diagram that makes sense.

line draw d

Oh rejoice with me friends it worked!!! Hallelujah. You’ll notice later on that the line that is in the squares around the perimeter are not stitched. The motif that gets stitched in there is so fun. Want to see from the back?

The outer box is 12 inches. I’m using the Quilters Select 12” x 6” ruler. I’m digging these as they grip the fabric so no shifting! I use the twelve inch side to draw the outer lines. The 6” side helps me to keep the ruler straight marking the next line. Why not use a 12” ruler? Well the ruler I currently own has a chip in one corner. That’s my excuse and I’m sticking to it.

drawing the outside square

drawing the block mark the center poings
Marking the center points on all four sides. I used a hash mark, a dot will suffice.

Measure in from each side 1 1/2 or 2 inches, this will create the inner square. See the diagram above.

drawing the outside square hold pen 45 angle
Tip: hold the marking pencil at an angle along the ruler. This will help keep your lines straight, and consistence.

Now to make the smaller squares: connect the dots. Place the ruler from hash mark to has mark on an angle. Draw a line from the dot, to the inside line.

drawing the inside triangle

Finally connect the inside lines. august quilted block of the month line pdf shows the start stop points.

finished block

For August we’re exploring how quilting looks on a highly patterned, very colored fabric. As a newer quilter I would often let the fabric do the work for me using simple motifs or stippling to accomplish the work of quilting, I daresay this is common among quilters, and it’s perfectly fine. Whatever gets the job done.

Batting
I’m using two layers of a cotton wool batting by Hobbs. I do love multiple layers of batting, this is something I started doing on competition quilts after Tilde won it’s ribbon. The first (back) later might be cotton, or bamboo to give stability to the quilt; the top layer is wool, or silk for great stitch definition. On the rare occasion that I make bed quilts one layer of wool or silk is perfect, as they breathe, and keep a body warm.

When Hobbs debuted this cotton/wool blend I thought I’d died and gone to heaven as it provides the stability I want with good stitch definition. Bonus!

Thread
The where and how will be over the next several weeks.
Superior Metallic – 40 wt. and shiny. Interestingly it’s quite subtle.
Superior MicroQuilter – 100 wt polyester this is a new must have in my thread collection for everything from stitch in the ditch, to the intense quilting I’m passionate about.

Backing
Is a striped batik from Robert Kaufman Fabrics. I’ll share that on Instagram later this week.

Happy Quilting!

Teri

Instagram: @terilucas
Twitter: @terificreations
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Lucy’s Nickles

Quilted Block of the Month: That corner bit

 

 

qbom full

Finishing is such a good thing. And finishing this first block of the month was fun for me. This week got away from me a bit, the block reveal will be soon.

The one motif I didn’t cover yet is the suns in the lower right hand corner.

radiant fill

What I like about this, and similar motifs, is that it’s flexible, giving us the ability to create visual movement, and resize as we stitch. Like Lamb Chop’s Song That Doesn’t End

So here’s how I approach the radiant suns.

spiral sun yay

Feel free to print this picture, use a pen, or your finger to follow the arrows and get the rhythm of how the radiant suns are stitched out.

swirls-and-more-swirls

Stay tuned for the next block of the month. It’ll start next Saturday. I’d like your thoughts on the color for the background. What say you peeps?

Quilted Block of the Month: New York Beauty
Quilted Block of the Month Batting

Quilted Block of the Month Part 2
Quilted Block of the Month Part 3

Happy Quilting!

Teri

UPDATE

Have you followed Joliene?

look at what she posted. She’s a damned fine quilter too

Quilted Block of the Month Part 3

“How do you get from here to there?” she asked. I promised to show her. When stitching on a pieced block, the ditch is your bestie.
qbom ribbon candy peak

The ribbon candy ended at the peak, to start the next wedge there are two options:
stop, tie off the thread, then restart in the next wedge. A viable option, one that I’d give consideration if this were a competition quilt.

travel in the ditch. This is a favorite option as it saves time, and thread. Depending on the weight of the thread it’s possible to stitch in the ditch several times without creating bulk, or warping the look of the quilt.

qbom travel 2

Stitching on the line, or in that ditch is key, however remember it’s perfectly fine if it’s not perfect. Wobbles on quilts add character.

qbom travel 3

I pause here to reposition my hands for a smooth transition.

qbom travel 4

You can see that the stitching isn’t exactly on that line. Yes I’m breaking my own rule for now showing the flaws. It’s my job as the teacher, and I take it very seriously. Yeah. Bridge. Brooklyn. I’ll make lots of money.

qbom travel 5

It’s only a little off, and most people wouldn’t notice it. Starting at the top of the peak let the ribbon candy begin. Next week there will drawings of the ribbon candy in the wedge, and the swirly sun motif in the lower corner.

qbom done

The next bit is NOT picking apart my work at all. overall I love this piece and will be happy to show it at any teaching venue.

Design Decisions happen.

Now I had to set this block aside for a few days. Upon returning I didn’t look before starting to quilt to see what thread I was using. I switched from Superior’s MicroQuilter to Wonderfil’s FabuLux, noticing only when starting the second wedge. I could have taken the stitching out, however I was grooving on the change in look, and the overall feel so I left it.

qbom yellow arrow

While stitching all the straight lines some distraction happened, phone call, meeting whatever – on one of the straight lines I stopped earlier than intended, to “fix it” an echoed circle seemed a great idea. It’s different, eye catching, and helps the eye travel over the surface of the quilt block. Were this a competition quilt the seam ripper and I would have had a hot date.

20170325_084043
One HOT date

I chose to bind front to back and stitch in the ditch, there are a couple of places where it’s not exactly pretty and there’s a wee bit o’fixin’ that needs to happen. Just not today.

Here are links to each one of the posts:

Week 1
Week 1a
Week 2a

Next week will be the final post for this block. If you have questions please ask. I love giving extra information.

Happy Quilting,

Teri

July Quilted Block of the month part 2

Last week we focused on the “bones” also known as stitching in the ditch. When you’re working on a quilt it’s not a “have to do” rather, it’s a good thing to do. When working on something like @play the bones get stitched as these would be the ditch in a pieced quilt top. Finer thread makes this stitching almost disappear into the batting, which is the goal.

NYB tension check

Our post ended with this delightful conundrum, makes you kind of tense doesn’t it. Changing thread weight and color means that the needle, and tension need some kind of adjustment. For the top Wonderfil FabuLux Hush a 40 wt. trilobal polyester (means shiny!) designed by Debby Brown, for the MicroQuilter by Superior, an 80 weight polyester. Finer threads in the bobbin take up less room in the stitch, allowing tighter, closer stitching without skewing the quilt.
Clearly the tension was off in the first few stitches. This is a simple adjustment of the tension.
– lift the presser foot lever
– increase the tension (move dial to a higher number)
– take a few stitches, stop and check
– if the tension is good, keep stitching
– if the tension isn’t good, tweak it

Using the Sewline Marking pencil I placed a dot, about an inch up from the arc, about in the middle. I stitched from the peak of the spikes to the dot, then from the dot to the next peak. Using the same thread, I arced back. Just a small curve from the top of the peak, to the same dot.

NYB corner making thread choices
What choice thread? Lime Green or Orange?

Next up the big expanse, other wise known as the corner. The options are limitless. A long time ago this would have completely freaked me out. Now either there’s something on my brain. Sometimes I wait. This is a time to doodle, write blog posts, articles, walk up and down the stairs for the heck of it. Then there’s the old phone a friend, and the send friend a picture of the quilt.

The thinking led me to straight lines. It’s a basic principle – opposites attract. Straight lines highlight, and help define curves; curves soften the feel of straight lines. General rule. Lots of straight lines can do something dynamic to a geometric, square, block style quilt. Straight lines chosen, because why not.

IMG_20170704_163633

Purple and orange are my favorite colors so I chose the orange Magnifico, another 40 weight, trilobal polyester thread. Stitch, stitch, stitch. Using the edge of the #24 Free Motion Embroidery foot, which measures 1/4 inch from needle center to the outside edge of the foot.

NYB straight lines

I started in the ditch (seam allowance) Next week I’ll show you the finished straight line quilting, including a wee bit of unplanned stitching, and what happened in the corner.