International Quilt Market & Apple Pie

I’m honored to share my years of experience working and teaching in quilt shops, teaching nationally, talking with shop owners, and working with Generation Q Magazine in each one of these talks. Join me at International Quilt Market. Check out Ebony Love, Cheryl Sleboda, Tracy Mooney, Maddie Kertay, Heather Kubiak, Pepper Cory and so many other presenters in ways that we can grow our businesses. Cheryl is offering business consultations with special Quilt Market pricing.

Reminder: Ebony Love is nearing the end of the Kickstarter Campaign to make new Sizzix dies for cutting some amazing quilts. Anything from sharing the post to $1.00 on up is a great show of support. Kickstarter campaigns are All or Nothing Events. If she meets the goal, she gets the money to make the dies, if not she doesn’t the opportunity to do this. Think of this as buying stock in a company for their growth and development.

Bonus! I’ll be staying through early Friday morning of Quilt Festival. I’ll be in the Pinwheels booth with Maria Tamaoka. She sells Daiwabo and Oakschott Cotton. Hooo baby let’s pet some fabric.

I made this deliciousness yesterday: Caramel-Bacon Apple Pie
2 crust pie crust (medium flake: a mixture of butter and shortening for the fat rocks it) I use the King Arthur Flour Recipe and add cider vinegar to the water.

1/2 c white sugar
1/2 c brown sugar
6 T butter
1/4 c water
2 t Cinnamon
8 strips precooked crispy bacon chopped up

Cook this in a skillet til it boils on medium heat. Reduce heat and let simmer for 10 more minutes. Set aside to cool

preheat oven to 400

a whole bunch of apples (4 – 6 cups)
slice or chop ’em your favorite way and place in a honkin’ big bowl

once the caramel mixture is coolish, pour over the apples to coat them completely

roll out bottom layer of pie crust layer in pie plate

dump the apples in crust
add apple mixture

roll out top crust

place over top, trim and pinch to seal the edges.

put pie plate on baking sheet and place in oven
reduce heat to 350
bake for an hour

take out of oven
cool
eat
enjoy

 

Cotton Cuts Charity Mystery Hop

Mystery Quilter logo

There is nothing like multiple deadlines all rolling into one really busy six weeks that says let’s get everything done all on the same day. Yesterday I mentioned I’d been sick, and sleeping was about all I could manage for the entire weekend. So, I slept.

Cottoncuts_color_white bg_small

You may remember a while back I wrote “caution opening box may lead to…”  I had the opportunity to meet up with Kim at spring market. T’was a delightful conversation filled with a few ideas. Including something like this blog hop/Mystery Quilt. Kim is something of a go-getter, took the fabric by the selvage, and started plotting  how this could work for Cotton Cuts – and here we are. I get the privilege of being Clue 3! Woot!

The clue arrived on time, as did a few other things in the works. Like a new job, things to learn, quilts to make for Market, my twenty fifth anniversary and getting ready for a quilt show where I have a boatload of work to prep. I took the aforementioned clue out of the packaging with pencils that have great quilterly sayings. What I didn’t plan on was getting sick right when the clue is due. Whoever expects the Spanish Inquisition._TeamZinnia (2)

With a few projects being worked on at the same time, the pieces were buried under a layer and a half of 2 1/2” squares for one quilt, and fabric ready to be cut into 2 1/2” squares for another project. After finding and sorting them, assigning the appropriate numbers for the fabric, the stitching began in earnest

cotton cuts 1

Oh, did I mention the epiphany I had while starting this project? No, hang onto your seam rippers, I’ll get there soon.

The first part of the clue has 2 segments, after sorting that precut pieces out I started stitching. Cool tidbit: no bunny ears on the triangles.

I’m using Superior MicroQuilter, a 100 wt (very fine) polyester thread for microquilting and applique, and I love it for piecing using a size 70/10 microtex needle, and shortened the stitch length to 2.25 mm.

Using a polyester thread also means I’m going to reduce the heat of the iron for setting the seam and pressing. This reduced heat means I’m not going to burn my fingers. I’m not particularly worried about the thread because I’ve been ironing cotton clothes made with polyester thread for years with no problems at all. What I do love about the 60, 80, and 100 wt threads, is the no bulk in the seam allowance.  cotton cuts 2

After piecing pressing with the finger pressing end of any multi-tool I have. Pictured here is the stiletto from byannie.com one of my faves! cotton-cuts-4-e1507162815600.jpg

I’ll be interested to see how the quilt comes together at the end of all of the clues.cotton cuts 3Because the color way is delightful.
So this Mystery Quilt has a purpose, it will be raffled off once it’s pieced and quilted, to benefit Valley Industries, the company that fulfills Cotton Cuts Boxes, this holds a special place in my heart for oh so many reasons. The raffle will remain open through the entire blogging event, tickets are $5.

Don’t forget to visit Cotton Cuts and read about their Mission.

July – Sheila Christensen (www.mysteryquilter.com) with guest blogger Kim Moos
August – Yvonne Fuchs (www.quiltingjetgirl.com)
September – Teri Lucas (www.terificreations.com)
October – Wendy Welsh (www.wendysquiltsandmore.blogspot.com)
November – Nicole Young (www.lillyella.com)
December – Chris Dodsley (www.madebychrissied.blogspot.com)
January – Amy Smart (www.diaryofaquilter.com)
February – Sam Hunter (www.huntersdesignstudio.com)
March – Cheryl Sleboda (www.muppin.com)

Wow! Wow! Wow!

While Shadowing one of the Floriani Educators last week my brain went into high gear. She could see it as I sat in the back of the room listening to Sarabeth. I’m not using her real name because she isn’t a huge fan of social media, and I’m respecting that. Sarabeth presented each one of the stabilizers, sharing around samples for each one of the attendees to touch and feel. As makers that touchy-feely part is important.

The last day she showed the software from the Design Album right through FTC-U. In each program the icons are the same so if you’re in one program and get the next one, the interface is familiar, making it easy to navigate. I can assure you that, as someone who is learning the software from the ground up, this makes working in each environment way easier.

There is something I want to do and may yet figure out how to do what I want. If not I’ll draw it out and let the software do the digitizing for me.

Now for something completely different. This is Brilliant!

Yesterday I was determined! to make freestanding lace. In the software I designed something really cool, however it was in the wrong order and I wasn’t poking the right buttons to optimize the start/stops. And somehow I ended up with these crazy long stitches that make the whole piece seem weird. Then in typical me fashion I promptly forgot how I got from here to there. Gah.

first freestanding laceSo I made a piece of lace from the motifs that are in the B 560. In the top Floriani Silver Metallic. In the bobbin Floriani Silver Metallic. The needle – who knows. I put it in before my trip and haven’t checked what it is. The ONLY issue I had: the silver metallic and the eye of the bobbin sensor couldn’t see the silver thread, so the machine kept stopping “thinking” that there was no bobbin thread. Solution: turn off the sensor while completing the stitch out.

In the hoop were 2 layers of Wet N Gone. That’s it, because I forgot to add the topping but whatev’s. After the machine finished stitching (no thread breaks!) I cut the stabilizer about 1/4” away from the motif. I can use the scraps for something else later. I went downstairs to talk to my Sweetie, and fix dinner. While in the kitchen the lace went into a small bowl of water. I went for less than 2 minutes to talk to him about something and when I got back the Wet N Gone was gone! Gone. Not slimy, not icky. Just gone! The water didn’t feel weird either. What’s left? giving the lace a quick press with the pressing cloth so it lays flat.

Last night after an hour long conversation with Trish, the gal who is going to be my right arm and leg at the Dutchess show in a couple of weeks I figured it out again. So now, today’s job is to make that piece of lace, and cut out 2 1/2” squares for a project for Sew Much Cosplay. The big reveal will be after Cheryl and Tracy see it because I might give them sneak peeks, I might not.

Happy Quilting!

Teri

 

Back to School Blog Hop: Bury Quilt Thread

BTS 16 Teri Lucas

Welcome to the Back to School Blog Hop hosted by Sam Hunter (Hunter’s Design Studio). Thanks Sam! Thirty-two days of tutorials by quilters and sewists, ready to share their experience and tips. At the bottom of the tutorial are links to each of the other participants in the hop. So many great tutorials!

One hundred years ago, when I learned to machine quilt the teacher (Carol Brubaker Martin) taught us many ways to handle thread ends when beginning and ending machine quilting. I settled on, and teach burying the thread ends with a needle and thread. This method gets the thread out of the way so the quilting can progress merrily along. Eventually I will update the PDF on the Tutorials and Helpful Hints page.

bury thread step one start here
Step one, get ready to stitch. Get the quilt under the needle where you want to start quilting.
bury thread step two drop needle
Holding onto the thread, my hands are over there <—-, drop the needle into the quilt.
bury thread step three needle up bring up bobbin
Bring the needle up, and pull on the top thread to pull the bobbin thread to the top of the quilt.
bury thread step four drop needle hold onto thread
Drop the needle back into the same hole. I use the hand wheel for more control.
bury thread step five get started stitching
Get started stitching. Move far enough away from the needle to make room for your hands.
bury thread step six trim thread ends
Clip the thread ends to the same length. This makes the next few steps so much easier.
bury thread step seven thread the needle
I use a Spiral Eye Needle to bury the thread. The opening on the side makes threading quick and easy. Alternately you can use use a quilting needle (size 9 or 10) and a needle threader to thread BOTH threads through the eye. Make a loop of thread, and pull the needle through the loop to make the knot. Alternately wrap the thread around the needle three or four times near the quilt.

 

bury thread step nine heres the knot
Here’s the knot. It’s about one-quarter of an inch away from the quilt. I try to get it about that close so it’s near the quilt, and about that far away so I can easily bury it.
bury thread step ten needle in first hole
Poke the needle into the hole where the thread came from. Wiggle the needle through the batting, this will place the knot IN the batting and out of your way.
bury thread step eleven weave needle through batting
Come up about an inch away from where the thread started.
bury thread step twelve pull through and pop knot
Pull on the thread until the knot goes into the fabric. You may hear a satisfying pop. Unless of course, like me, the music is playing in the background.
bury thread step thirteen clip the thread
Now you’re ready to keep on stitching! Yes, you can stitch over the where you buried the thread! The knot is too small to do any kind of damage, or deflect the needle in any way..
bury thread step fourteen keep quilting
When you’re finished quilting bring the needle up.
bury thread step fifteen needle up pull thread through needle
Grab the top thread and give it a good pull, you’ll need the tail to finish the process.
bury thread step sixteen clip thread and hold onto thread in needle
Clip the thread and hold onto that tail!
bury thread step seventeen drop needle
Drop the needle back down where you took that final stitch.
bury thread step eighteen pull up bobbin thread and clip
While holding onto the thread bring the needle back up. This will pull the bobbin thread up.
bury thread step nineteen heres what the loop looks like
Give the top thread a pull to bring enough of the bobbin thread up to have a tail that you can bury.
bury thread step twenty pull long enough tail
Clip it and…

 

bury thread step twenty one spiral eye needle
Thread the eye of the needle
bury thread step twenty two make quilters knot again loop needle through loop
Make that quilters knot
bury thread step twenty three needle in last thread hole repeat way back
poke the needle in where the thread came up and weave through the batting
bury thread step twenty four pull knot through listen for pop
tug on the thread to hear that pop and pull the knot into the batting
bury thread step twenty five clip threads
Clip the thread and voila! Done.

Now, on the odd chance that the thread didn’t pull back into the quilt put your needle between the batting and the top of the quilt near the thread and sweep the needle. It’ll pull the threads between the layers.

Please visit the other blog hoppers and see what they’ve got goin’ on.

Day 1 – August 15 – Sam Hunter: How to spray baste a BIG quilt
Day 2 – August 16 – Mandy Leins: Thread Dread: removing stray bits after quilting
Day 3 – August 17 – Nancy Stovall: The Sweet Creamy Filling
Day 4 – August 18 – Ebony Love: 7 Indispensible feet for your sewing machine Day 5 – August 19 – Michelle Freedman: Machine throat plates
Day 6 – August 20 – Teresa Coates: Edge/Under/Top stitching
Day 7 – August 21 – Kelly Cole: Ten ways to regain your sew-jo
Day 8 – August 22 – Megan Dougherty: Choose to Fuse: tips for working with fusibles for applique
Day 9 – August 23 – Kim Lapacek: Tricks to being productive while hauling your kids around
Day 10 – August 24 – Yvonne Fuchs: Circuitboard quilting on Domestic and Longarm Machines
Day 11 – August 25 – Sandi Hazlewood: Chain Piecing Quilt Blocks Tips
Day 12 – August 26 – Juliet van der Heijden: Paper-piecing with children
Day 13 – August 27 – Maddie Kertay: Fabric folding for any storage solution
Day 14 – August 28 – Cath Hall: Working with Lawn fabric
Day 15 – August 29 – Tracy Mooney: Tips for the perfect seam
Day 16 – August 30 – Teri Lucas: How to bury thread
Day 17 – August 31 – Debby Brown: Securing machine quilting knots
Day 18 – September 1 – Flaun Cline: How to put some sparkle in your fabric pull (part 1)
Day 19 – September 2 – Jessica Darling: How to put some sparkle in your fabric pull (part 2)
Day 20 – September 3 – Trish Frankland: A bigger blade really IS better?!
Day 21 – September 4 – Robin Koehler Nestlings by Robin: How to travel with handwork
Day 22 – September 5 – Jane Davidson: How to make scrappy HSTs
Day 23 – September 6 – Linda Pearl: Low cost tips for organizing your sewing room
Day 24 – September 7 – Christa Watson – Top 10 tips for quilting on a domestic machine
Day 25 – September 8 – Sarah Nunes: To Starch or Not to Starch
Day 26 – September 9 – Suzy Webster: Testing fabric for bleeding
Day 27 – September 10 – Sarah Goer: Machine bind your quilts like a pro
Day 28 – September 11 – Vanda Chittenden: Beginner paper-piecing tips
Day 29 – September 12 – Cheryl Sleboda: Needle threading tips
Day 30 – September 13 – Kim Niedzwiecki – Different thread weights and when to use them
Day 31 – September 14 – Sandra Healy: Conquer Your Fear of Machine Appliqué
Day 32 – September 15 – Sandra Starley: The Basics of Antique Quilt Collecting

 

So, there’s this!

thank you 2Maddie Kertay, and Cheryl Sleboda encouraged me to submit classes for Fall Quilt Market. After some thought I submitted three classes, and two are accepted. First up on Saturday October 28 is Creating Consumer Confidence—Machine Sales; the second is Sunday October 29th Creating Confidence in the In-Store Talent. Having worked in quilt shops on and off for the last 9 years I’ve watched, experienced, and listened to the needs of the shops, owners, employees, and the customer. Each is important, playing a key role in the success of the shop. Thank you to Quilts, Inc for seeing the value in these classes, and to Maddie and Cheryl for encouraging me to submit these classes. Maddie, will be teaching as will Ebony Love, Pepper Cory, Tracy Mooney, Dave Gilleland, Teresa Coates and so many great people. (Some will be Schoolhouse presentations or Take & Teach classes.) I look forward to seeing you there. 

Debby has shared, and we’ve talked about 1000 Postcards for Peace. I have the first one made, and decided about fifteen minutes ago, to make two more in the next few days. I don’t yet know where they are going, however I’ll be making postcards. The why isn’t as important as there are things in life that call for a moment of something (hopefully) good. Please feel free to join us in this effort.

Last week I started this Opal Dahlia designed by Jeanie Sumrall-Ajero by Hoffman Fabrics. After several false quilting starts, including thinking I wanted to stitch an overall meander, I settled on this:

IMG_20170622_174640

It took a little bit to get here, sometimes ya know that something simple is good, but what that simple is isn’t quite clear. With a little focus this will be finished tomorrow before I focus on a few other things.

Happy Quilting!

Teri

 

Home: where the coffee and internet are

I’m home. Good coffee. Immediate, and good wifi. My suitcase and carry-on are over there waiting for me to take them down to the basement where my office, and laundry room are. But I’m watching the latest episode of Dr. Who and considering making more coffee. I’ve got the post Market groggy feeling, that this time includes a “good golly I missed so much and it’s nagging at me” experience.  I’ll get through it as I work through my notes, send emails, look at product, and await images for a couple of blog posts for GenQ.

Today is the final day of the 18217683_10154868553702663_1383341271_n

blog tour. Head on over to Cheryl Sleboda’s blog where she shows us her studio, complete with time lapse video. Thanks for joining us on the tour, it’s been a lot of fun getting to know new people, seeing their studios, and cleaning my own space. I need to make room for some things that I’ll share later. I can’t share everything all at once, a little mystery goes a very long way.

Catch ya after a nap. I can tell you there is something new from Cotton Cuts.

Happy Quilting!

Teri

reading is fun-damental & a nip o’fun

I have a whole big bunch of e-books sitting in my to read in a file on my computer. It’s a great file to go to for quilty inspiration. Jean Wells has an update on Intuitive Color & Design that I’m looking forward to spending time with. Her work has influenced nearly all of my quilting life. So digging into this is high on the priority list.

All the Light you cannot see is next on the reading list, got it from the library. Tomorrow I’m flying out to St. Louis for Quilt Market and will have a layover in Atlanta. Reading time!

Today is some final Market Prep, laundry, packing, checking in for my flight. Making sure I have all of the electronic stuff necessary. Two meetings for Generation Q.

I’ll be doing facebook live vids from the show floor on both the GenQ page and my own personal page. The live vid with Tracy and Cheryl should be Sew Much Fun.

If you’re going to be at Market here’s your reminder about a few Market classes to take. And the Spring Clean Your Studio Blog Tour.

Oh! Oh! Yes the Dutchess Heritage Quilt Celebration.

There are classes to teach. And quilts to make. And fabric to fondle.

Happy Quilting!

Teri